California SB 100 REGISTRATION INFORMATION

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California SB 100 REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Postby Larry Jowdy » Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:01 pm

This information was written by Barry Schmidt (goofycat) with annotations by Patrick Mervin (Arch)

I took delivery of my Subaru-powered Vintage in early August, 2007 from Greg Leach in Stanton, California. I had previously checked with DMV in Santa Rosa, California (about 450 miles north of Stanton) and found that I would require a waiver from DMV so that I could drive the car home without getting ticketed. The slip was for a straight-line trip from Stanton to Santa Rosa and cost $17. Without this paper, you would definitely receive a fine if stopped by the California Highway Patrol (CHP). No side-trips are permitted.



The next step is to make an appointment with the CHP for the Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) plate, since the wait is several weeks. Then, appoint with DMV so as to get the ball rolling for the ultimate receipt of your permanent registration and plates a few months later. This requires a first visit to DMV, where they will complete a cursory check of your car and get the paperwork started. I do mean that the check is cursory---at least at the local office I visited. The inspector had no idea what the car was, much less knowing what was under the engine lid. It took less than five minutes to get the car checked, after which I entered the administration office so as to get a temporary license sticker. This is the 5x5 inch pink sticker that is to be placed inside the windscreen so you can drive the car while waiting for the SB100 SPCNS Certificate of Sequence, which will be ultimately sent in the form of a printout from DMV. More about that later.



Note that the VIN is not issued at this visit. VIN numbers are issued via a slip of paper which will be given to you later by CHP. Also, keep in mind that your license plates will not be issued until after you have visited BAR---the last place you must visit prior to going back to DMV after you have received your Sequence Number in the year following your initial car delivery. As a result, you will have to drive with no plates, but your temporary registration sticker will make your car legal to drive. This sticker can be issued only twice, so the maximum time allowed prior to your January 2 Sequence Number visit is 180 days (each sticker allows up to three months). The sticker will list a month (6 or 12 etc) and that is the expiration month of the temporary driving permit) You pay the $17 only once, even if you require the second sticker. If you do run out of the time allowed by the first sticker, you must visit DMV again to get the second (and final) sticker.



At the above DMV visit, you must show your (1) Certificate of Origin. This is the paper issued to you by the builder, showing the body type, date of delivery, invoice number, year and make of the vehicle, horsepower, model, etc. It looks like a diploma; (2) your Application for Title or Registration (DMV form 343). This form must be filled out by you. (3) Your invoices from the builder showing the cost to you for the car and the taxes you paid the builder. If the builder fails to show the taxes paid, you will be liable to the DMV to pay the taxes again. Since it is assumed that you are at least partially building the car (i.e., you are installing the engine and transmission) I advise that you purchase the engine from a separate source and the tranny from a separate source, making sure that you get receipts for those costs, including the taxes you paid for those items. Do not lose those receipts. In addition to showing the taxes you have paid, those invoices show that you did, in fact, put the car together yourself. The reason for this is that without your participation in the construction of your car, the car in effect becomes manufactured by a single company and not 'homemade' and therefore not subject to the rules of SPCNS (specially constructed vehicles) which most importantly allows SB100 and smog exemption) How much grease you got on your hands, of course, is not up to the DMV to determine
Last edited by Larry Jowdy on Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:44 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby Larry Jowdy » Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:07 pm

Also, fill out the (4) Statement of Construction (DMV form 5036) and Statement of Facts (DMV Form 256). On the Statement of Construction, fill in Section #1 with the number given you by the builder (the same as that shown on the Certificate of Origin). For Section #2, check \"by me.\" For section #3, check all four boxes; For section #4, write in, \"See 256 Statement of Facts.\" In Section #5, fill out the the things you paid for and make sure they add up to the Total Value at the bottom.



For the Statement of Facts, fill out the vehicle number (previously stamped on the frame by the builder), and the year/make of the vehicle. Sections A and B are left blank. Section C: Check the box for \"Title Only.\" Section D is left blank. Leave Sections E and F blank. Under Statement of Facts, write in that you purchased the body and frame (and transaxle, if the tranny was part of the roller) and that you purchased the engine separately and installed it yourself, and that you need temporary papers to allow you to drive the car on public roads legally until January 2, 20XX, when you will be able to apply for permanent registration, etc. Then, sign and date Section H.



I had completed my Brake and Light system check at a local gas station (which also doubled as a certified inspection location). They check out everything, including your turn signals, brake lights, headlights and brakes. Make sure they all work before you make your appointment there. I payed a total of $140 for this procedure. They will give you an invoice stating that they have inspected and certified the car and that it has passed those inspection. They will also give you a small Certificate of Adjustment - Brake Adjustment for you to take to the BAR. This document is about 5 x 5\", so don't lose it, or you may well have to have the inspection done all over again.

Note: I had a bit of difficulty with this step because the brake/light inspection tech was very thorough and felt he needed to reference my brake system to some known system in his specification manual – I called the manufacturer (Vintage) and determined that my disc brakes resembled early 70's Karmann Ghia disc brakes and this was acceptable to the tech and I passed with no difficulty.



So, to summarize: At this point you will have just completed your DMV mini-inspection, for which you will need an appointment, after which you have entered the administrative section of DMV with whatever paperwork the inspection guy has given you. When you go to the counter, you will present:



1. Your DMV mini-inspection papers you just received from the DMV inspector

2. The Certificate of Origin you were given from the builder of the car

3. Receipts/invoices you received from the engine, tranny and frame/body builders,

4. Statement of Construction (Form 5036) that you have previously filled out

5. Statement of Facts (Form 256) that you have previously filled out

6. A check to pay to get the registration ball rolling. I paid $325.



THEN.....you need to go to CHP for a formal VIN number. There will be a wait of several weeks (unless you got lucky), but not to worry....you have a temporary registration on you windshield. Take the above paperwork. I have no idea what paperwork they check, but I had no problems with them because I took all my paperwork, not really knowing what they wanted. DMV does not issue you a formal VIN. CHP does......My VIN originated from Vintage. It was stamped on the frame and was used by CHP as the permanent VIN. CHP does not do much of an inspection. The man there merely gave the car a cursory look, checked the number stamped on the frame, and gave me an \"Application for Assigned Vehicle identification Number Plate.\" This Application was taken back to DMV on January 2 when I applied for a Sequence Number. CHP's roll in this process is evidently to make sure the car and/or engine has not been stolen. Arch received a blue metal plate which the CHP inspector attached to the frame of his car.
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Postby Larry Jowdy » Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:09 pm

I did not receive such a plate, but CHP said I did not need one, since the frame number was stamped onto the frame by the builder. The metal plate is nice to have, however, in case you ever get stopped by the CHP (I suppose......). At any rate, Arch told me the CHP wanted the blue plate in plain sight and they attached it to a visible frame member in the cockpit.



There is no fee for the CHP visit. You should make an appointment for this CHP visit as soon as you get your car home, since it can take as long as two months (or longer) to get in to see them and at our local CHP office there was only one officer assigned to this... and it you wait until, say, November, you may not be able to see them until after January 2, at which time you will be out of luck and will have to wait another year. For this reason, as far as I am concerned, you should not plan to take delivery of your car after the first nine months of the year, unless you don't mind having a garage queen for a long time. The alternative, of course, is to bypass the SB100 procedure and go directly to BAR for a smog inspection, which means, of course, your having to get your car smogged every two years. This means oxygen sensors, catalytic converters, etc., and whatever else is involved to please the bureaucrats at BAR (or by proving that your engine is pre-1967 and therefore not required to have smog equipment – but you will still have to get it smog checked every two years ). But...once you have your Sequence Number under the SB100 rules, you will never have to get your car to be smogged.



So.....at this point, you have been to DMV, been to CHP and have all the paperwork for your original DMV visit, your CHP visit and your visit to the light/brake inspectors. Now, you need to get an appointment with DMV again for your January 2 application for your Sequence Number. DMV does not accept appointments sooner than 30 days for this visit. I tried to go online to get an appointment the minute they opened, but I could not get an appointment until almost 11:00 AM on January 2, 2008 (a Wednesday). At this writing, California DMV opens at 9:00 AM only on Wednesdays, so make sure you know exactly when the offices open.



Since I could not get an appointment until late in the morning, I arrived at DMV at 7:00 AM and set up a folding chair right in front of the door so as to be the first one into the office. They opened at 9:00 and I marched up to the desk before anyone else, regardless of whether or not they had an appointment. I was sent immediately to the clerk who was familiar with SB100 procedures and was issued a number right away. I was also issued another temporary registration, good until the end of February, 2008.



This visit took some planning. I had previously checked with Arch, who had visited the same office, about 60 miles away, but in a smaller town. Arch had told me this particular office knew how to get through to Sacramento and knew the procedure. He had received his Sequence Number with no problems as a result of his doing his homework.

Additionally, I made a trek to that particular office with all my paperwork at least two or three weeks before my January 2 visit just to make sure I would not have any surprises. I didn't want to suffer from any DMV or CHP screwups and find out at the last minute that I would not be eligible to even apply for a Sequence Number. My advice, therefore, is to make sure the office is reasonably well-versed in the SB100 procedural stuff. If it isn't, find out which one is, even if it means traveling to another DMV location.



My next step is to receive my Sequence Number printout from DMV, then visit BAR, then back to DMV for License plates and permanent registration. The DMV clerk stated on January 2 that it takes 10 days to receive the Sequence Number printout. I called a week ago since I had not yet received the printout. They said that due to the holidays, I should check back on February 2.
Last edited by Larry Jowdy on Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Larry Jowdy » Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:12 pm

To summarize:



1. Go to DMV for a temporary one-way registration so you can drive your car home legally.



2. Take delivery of your car. Make sure you get the Certificate of Origin from the builder, plus all invoices from the car builder, the engine builder, the tranny builder (if different from the transaxle delivered with the roller from the builder). Make sure the invoices list the total costs, plus taxes paid .



3. When you get home, call CHP for a verification/VIN application visit. It takes a couple of months, so do this right away.



4. Make an appointment with DMV for an initial inspection of your car and to get the registration paperwork started. Take a check to pay them. Make sure you have all your paperwork listed previously.



5. Get your VIN application from the CHP.



6. Having made an appointment (or show up and be first in line) visit DMV on the first day of business in January for your Sequence Number. Take all your paperwork with you.



7. After you get your Sequence Number printout mailed from DMV, get an appointment with BAR (call (800) 622-7733 to make this BAR appointment).



8. Arrange for your Brake and Light Inspection. Make sure you have your brake and light inspection from a certified inspection facility. BAR will not be pleased if you waste their time when you show up without this document.

9. Visit the BAR referee. They will inspect your vehicle, give it a smog test for their records and issue a sticker that they will attach to your vehicle – mine was placed next to the blue CHP VIN plate.



10. Wait a few days for the BAR referee to input the data on your car and allow the documentation to filter through the DMV computer system.

11. Go back to DMV with all your paperwork (including what BAR gives you) so you can get your license plates and permanent registration.



12. Drive your car home, attach your plate(s), make sure you have your registration and proof of insurance tucked inside your door or under your seat in an envelope, sit down, relax and enjoy some of your favorite red wine in a paper cup.



Note on custom California special interest license plates; these plates can be ordered online anytime at the CA DMV website. Assuming that the wording you want is available you can even order the plates when you take delivery of your car several months before you actually have it registered in January. The time from ordering special plates to delivery can take a few months and these special interest plates are not linked to any specific vehicle until you pick them up and surrender the old plates and formally link them to your vehicle. You will get a notice in the mail saying that your special interest plates are waiting at your local DMV office and if you time it right you can pick them up at the same time you complete your final paperwork and issuance of plates after the BAR visit and never be issued random plates. If you order specialty plates after the final DMV visit then you just go to the DMV and surrender your originally issued plates for your new special interest plates.
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